Gemstones

Agate

 
Agate is a fine-grained chalcedony quartz. The main characteristic that set agate apart from other chalcedonies are the patterns, curves or angular stripes and bands of color.
Varieties: Blue Lace Agate, Botswana Agate, Dendritic Agate, Fire Agate, Laguna Agate, Moss Agate, Landscape Agate, Iris Agate.
 

 

 

Amazonite
 
Amber is an organic gem. It formed millions of years ago, when sap from ancient trees hardened and fossilized.
 
Amber
 
Amber is an organic gem. It formed millions of years ago, when sap from ancient trees hardened and fossilized.
 
Amethyst

 

Amethyst is a member of the quartz family and comes in a color selection ranges from pale lilac to strong saturated purple.

 

 

The major source of Amethyst is Brazil. Other locations where amethyst is mined include Sri Lanka, India, Uruguay, Madagascar, Germany, Australia, Mexico, Africa, Russia, Bolivia and the United States.

 

 

Hardness & Toughness

Hardness: 7 on Mohs scale

Toughness: Good

 
Apatite

 

There are three minerals that actually contribute to apatite, which is the reason for the varied colors and shades of this stone. Apatite is calcium phosphate combined with fluorine, chlorine or hydroxyl.

 
Aquamarine/Beryl

 

Aquamarine, a splendid blue gemstone whose name originates from the Italian word for seawater, embodies the splendor of the sea. A member of the beryl family, aquamarine is a sister to the rich green emerald. It can be found in a range of pale blue hues and aqua green colors. Legends refer to aquamarine as the treasure of Atlantis, with the power to keep sailors safe at sea.

 
Citrine

 

Natural citrine is rare. Its name is derived from the word citrus because of its pale yellow color (due to its iron content). Most citrine on the market is heat-treated amethyst or smoky quartz

 
Emerald
 

© 2013 by Susana Schnaider. All rights reserved.